Advertisement
Salesforce
Salesforce

Salamander Evolution

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

By | June 1, 2013

A female spotted salamander gravid with eggs in route to her breeding pool.

A female spotted salamander gravid with eggs in route to her breeding pool.

PHOTO: STEVE BRADY

Salamander Evolution Image Gallery

Read the full story.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Comments

Avatar of: FishHead

FishHead

Posts: 1

June 19, 2013

Question?  Were salamander eggs taken from the road side sites and transferred to the "wild sites"?   The article didn't address if moving stress alone wound cause egg death or a lower success of the wild type eggs that were moved to road sites.

Avatar of: Dan Cossins

Dan Cossins

Posts: 237

June 20, 2013

Hi FishHead.

Yes, the salamander eggs were transplanted in both directions -- from the "wild" ponds to the roadside ponds and vice versa.

"The stress of moving was equivalent for both types of populations and did not appear to influence the outcome," said Steven Brady, author of the paper. "This is further evidenced by the observation that two types of populations (represented by the very same families as those employed in the field transplant) performed equivalently well in neutral lab conditions. So basically, the methods themselves did not appear to bias the outcome in any way."

I hope that answers your question.

Thanks,

Dan Cossins

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
Ingenuity
Ingenuity

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
HIWIN
HIWIN
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Life Technologies