One Profile Fits All

Federal agencies partner up to develop an online tool for researchers to build a universal biosketch to accompany grant applications.

By | November 21, 2013

WIKIMEDIA, MODIt’s the Common Application for the research professional: the Science Experts Network (SciENcv), a beta version of which opened to the public in September, is a new online tool for developing a biosketch and curriculum vitae (CV) with which to apply for federal funding and submit progress reports on existing grants.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Smithsonian, the US Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Departments of Defense and Energy all teamed up with the Federal Demonstration Partnership and the extramural research community “to create a system that will provide comprehensive curriculum vita information, and at the same time reduce the burden associated with applying for research support,” Sally Rockey wrote on her NIH blog, Rock Talk.

Specifically, the network, designed by the NIH’s National Center for Biotechnology Information, allows scientists to build profiles of biographical information, including their educational background and funding history, and link them to publications records in PubMed and myBibliography, Rockey explained. Furthermore, the system will allow researchers already using eRA Commons—an online interface for sharing administrative information relating to research grants—to import their information to jumpstart their profiles, and from SciENcv, researchers can link to another professional networking site, ORCID.

“We are planning to enhance the capability of the system and allow users to import data from other profile systems and to create NSF biosketches during the 2014 fiscal year,” wrote Rockey, who noted that more than 1,000 researchers have already signed up. “When fully implemented, SciENcv will provide a structured, digital view of biosketch information for grant applications for all participating federal science agencies.”

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