HYPERION 3000 FT-IR Spectrometer for Micro-Applications

The HYPERION is the culmination of more than 25 years of experience in FT-IR microscopy. Its high-quality design, including all optical, mechanical, and electronic components, provides high stability and reliability.

By | February 7, 2014

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The HYPERION 3000 is the measurement tool for challenging micro-applications. Full automation, a novel LCD user interface, a wide variety of different objectives together with the automated software control allow a very easy and efficient way to gain demanding IR micro-spectroscopic results.

The HYPERION 3000 provides access to mapping and imaging within one instrument, whereby the switch between both acquisition techniques is controlled by the software. Using the HYPERION 3000 a sample area of 340 x 340 μm can be analyzed simultaneously at a nominal spatial resolution of 2.7 μm. Bigger areas are covered by combining the FPA detector and the motorized sample stage in an automated manner (mosaic imaging).

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Bruker Corporation HYPERION Series

image of: Bruker Corporation HYPERION Series

The HYPERION is the culmination of more than 25 years of experience in FT-IR microscopy.

HYPERION 3000

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