New Animal Origin Free (AOF) Enzymes For Biomedical, Primary & Stem Cell Research

Worthington Biochemical now produces collagenase and several proteases certified Animal Origin Free (AOF) to eliminate BSE/TSE (prion) and mammalian virus contamination risks associated with bovine and other animal-sourced enzymes.

By | February 19, 2014

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Worthington Biochemical now produces collagenase and several proteases certified Animal Origin Free (AOF) to eliminate BSE/TSE (prion) and mammalian virus contamination risks associated with bovine and other animal-sourced enzymes for biomedical, primary and stem cell isolation and other bioprocessing related applications.

Non-mammalian AOF collagenases Types A, C and C, neutral protease, recombinant DNase I, RNase T1 and other AOF plant and fungal sourced proteases are now available in bulk quantities.

Worthington Biochemical is an ISO9001 Certified developer and producer of high quality purified enzymes, proteins, nucleic acids and cell isolation kits for applications in life science research, diagnostics, bioprocessing & biotechnology. With worldwide distribution, Worthington markets products direct to domestic customers and internationally through a network of distributors. Products are supplied for primary cell isolation & cell culture, protein research, molecular biology, diagnostics, biotech and biopharm and other biomedical related applications.

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Product Details

Worthington Biochemical Corporation STEMxyme 1

image of: Worthington Biochemical Corporation STEMxyme 1

STEMxyme™ 1, Collagenase/Neutral Protease (Dispase)

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