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Scientific Elevator Pitches

A number of competitions around the world are challenging young scientists to describe their research in mere minutes.

By | August 1, 2014

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Avatar of: mightythor

mightythor

Posts: 44

August 21, 2014

This used to be called cocktail party science.  It is science for people with very short attention spans, which I guess is most of us anymore.

Avatar of: JohnRemi

JohnRemi

Posts: 1

December 12, 2014

It comes across to me that this new style is a result of information overload.

Information is overwhelming everyone.  BigData is the serious problem facing humans today.  No person or computer software is fast enough and or large enough and or has enough time to keep up with, filter, sort, digest, understand, etc. the volumes of information & data being generated today.

 

 

Avatar of: davidrubenson

davidrubenson

Posts: 2

Replied to a comment from JohnRemi made on December 12, 2014

December 12, 2014

This is a powerful idea because the "elevator pitch" is not only effective for communicating with public, but it is also the starting point for a full presentation to scientists.  Most scientific presentations are dizzying whirlwinds of incomprehensible slides delivered at lightening speeds, with font sizes that are too small, and abbreviations known only to the speaker.  The core reason  is that most scientists develop a presentation by "cutting down" rather than "building up."  To develop an effective presentation, one needs to first identify the core message and then "build up" by adding supporting detail to fit the time, capability, and information needs of the particular audience.

More details of this approach can be found at nobadslides.com 

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