2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

Submissions are officially open for this year’s Top 10 Innovations contest.

By | April 13, 2015

It’s time to submit a product or methodology to The Scientist’s 2015 Top 10 Innovations competition.

In previous years our judges have singled out 3-D organ models, next-gen sequencers, cutting-edge microscopes, fluorescent RNA detection probes, and futuristic genetic-modification technologies—all products that continue to revolutionize research and push biology’s boundaries. (See the 2014 Top 10 Innovations winners.)

You can enter a laboratory tool, technology, software, methodology, or product for a chance to win a coveted spot in The Scientist’s Top 10 Innovations of 2015, as ranked and rated by an expert panel of independent judges. This year, we’ve opened the submissions process to include not only product managers, developers, or marketers who manufacture exciting new life-science tools, but also to users of innovative products. So whether you make them, sell them, or use them in the lab, enter today to see how your favorite new life-science innovation ranks among this year’s crop.

Past winners can attest to the fact that entering the contest is well worth the few minutes it takes to fill out the submission form.

Tilmann Buerckstuemmer, director of R&D at Horizon Genomics, told The Scientist that winning second place in the 2013 Top 10 Innovations contest for the company’s X-Man reporter kits was great for business. “Following the announcement [that we had won], our cell line sales increased quite significantly,” he said. “So we definitively feel it was worth applying!”

And Stephen Ripp, chief operating officer of 490 Biotech, reported a similar uptick for his firm’s humanized bacterial luciferase, which took sixth place in the 2013 competition. “We saw the number of requests for our autobioluminescent cell lines more than double after the publication of the Top 10 Innovations list, and our product is now integrated into research programs at major universities and government labs around the world,” Ripp said. “We were thrilled to be chosen as a Top 10 Innovation and cannot thank The Scientist enough for the exposure it has provided us.”

Submissions will be accepted until 12:00 a.m. EDT September 15. The winners will be announced on December 1, with a feature-length article highlighting this year’s Top 10 winners in that month’s issue of The Scientist.

Read the complete rules and submit your innovation today!

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