Gut Microbiome After Weight-Loss Surgery

Gastric bypass surgery can have long-term effects on the composition of the gut microbiome, a small study shows.

By | August 5, 2015

WIKIMEDIA, ETHICON ENDOSURGERY, INC.

Researchers have found evidence linking bariatric surgery to long-term changes among the microbial populations of the GI tract, according to a small study published in Cell Metabolism this week (August 4). The results are based on a nine-year follow-up study of seven women who opted for a gastric bypass and seven other women who had the size of their stomachs reduced via vertical band gastroplasty.

The gut microbiomes of the bypass patients displayed significant compositional differences compared to those of seven obese women who did not undergo surgery.  Specifically, Live Science reported, Escherichia, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas were more commonly found in the intestines of patients who had the bariatric surgery. Otherwise, there were no statistically significant differences among the three groups. These changes were not dependent on body-mass index or the amount of fat lost after surgery.

When the researchers—led by Fredrik Bäckhed of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden—transferred stool from the bypass-surgery patients into germ-free mice, they found that the mice experienced a number of metabolic changes, including improved fat oxidation. Over the course of two weeks, the microbe transplant-recipient mice also gained 43 percent less body fat compared to animals that received stool from gastroplasty patients.

“Our findings are important in light of the growing epidemic of obesity and associated diseases,” Bäckhed said in a statement. “Since surgery always confers a risk, it is critical to identify non-surgical strategies. One potential strategy would be to devise novel probiotics based on our findings that can be supplied to obese individuals.”

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Avatar of: Lillian45

Lillian45

Posts: 2

August 6, 2015

Surgery isnt the only option for losing weight. If you are drastically overweight then maybe you have only surgery to go for but for me personally diet has prooven to be a wonderful solution.   I have recently lost 22 pounds with the diet of lisa plog and am on my way to be fit again. Google for "lisa plog diet plans" and you would be able to follow her diet.   It is much easier to follow a diet then workout atleast for me.    
Avatar of: jenniferfranklin

jenniferfranklin

Posts: 2

August 6, 2015

This is very timely.  I became morbidly obese and diabetic in my middle age having no history of obesity - i'd like to think that antibiotics possibly changed my gut in a way that precipitated this but,  of course, that's purely speculative.  I opted for a distal bypass surgery option which completely cured my diabetes and put me after 10 years in the category of mildly obese which remain stable for 10 years.  7 months ago i began a pre/probiotic program using a soil-based probiotic formula (prescript assist)  rather than the more common lacto-type bacilli because there was some clinical evidence for its efficacy.  My goal was to manage reflux problems.  The outcome was pretty remarkable.

Made a big difference in indigestion AND for no other apparent reason, over the course of 6 months,  I lost 50 pounds totally normalizing my weight!  Because i lost the weight unexpectedly, my dr ran various diagnostics and there appears to be no explanation other than changing my gut!

 

Avatar of: jenniferfranklin

jenniferfranklin

Posts: 2

August 6, 2015

This is very timely.  I became morbidly obese and diabetic in my middle age having no history of obesity - i'd like to think that antibiotics possibly changed my gut in a way that precipitated this but,  of course, that's purely speculative.  I opted for a distal bypass surgery option which completely cured my diabetes and put me after 10 years in the category of mildly obese which remain stable for 10 years.  7 months ago i began a pre/probiotic program using a soil-based probiotic formula (prescript assist)  rather than the more common lacto-type bacilli because there was some clinical evidence for its efficacy.  My goal was to manage reflux problems.  The outcome was pretty remarkable.

the probiotic made a big difference in indigestion AND for no other apparent reason, over the course of 6 months,  I lost 50 pounds totally normalizing my weight!  Because i lost the weight unexpectedly, my dr ran various diagnostics and there appears to be no explanation other than changing my gut!

 

Avatar of: Paul Stein

Paul Stein

Posts: 210

August 6, 2015

Not so fast.  Regarding the weight loss in the mice, the conclusions can be a bit off.  Basically, in the study A (suyrgery) lead to B (microbiome changes) which lead to C (after transplant, weight loss).  So, they are concluding, possibly incorrectly, that A lead directly to C.  All they know is that transplanting human bacteria into mice lead to weight loss.

So, what are they figuring for "non-surgical strategies"?  Create some bacteria pills to give to people?  Going to a bad [insert ethnicity here] restaurant or going to any exotic country will do the same thing in the short term.

Long term, I think there's a lot more going on physiologically than any microbiome stuff.

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