Precision Medicine: Learning Lessons From the Microbiome

For a detailed look at the state of the microbiome and its role in precision medicine, The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to share their research and discuss the next steps.

By | October 25, 2016

 

The influence of gut microbiota on human health has been well documented, particularly in the case of metabolic disorders, such as type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In light of the strong association between the composition of one’s microbiome and human health, researchers have begun to develop targeted therapies that restore optimal balance among microbial populations. Fecal transplantation and strain supplementation are just two of the methods that address disease from a precision medicine vantage point. For a detailed look at the state of the microbiome and its role in precision medicine, The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to share their research and discuss the next steps. Attendees will have an opportunity to interact with the experts, ask questions, and seek advice on topics related to their research.

Topics to be covered:

  • The human microbiome’s influence on health
  • The challenges of translating microbiome studies into precision medicine therapies

Meet the Speakers:

Rob Knight, PhD
Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Computer Science & Engineering
University of California, San Diego

 

 

Robert A. Britton, PhD
Professor, Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology
Member, Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research
Baylor College of Medicine

 

 

Qiagen
DNA Genotek
Labcyte

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