Speaking of Neuroscience

A selection of notable quotes from the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting

By and | November 18, 2016

VINCE NAVARRO

It’s slow but it’s steady and eventually it hits big pay dirt.

Walter Koroshetz, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) director, on the process of science

We’ve come to recognize that we know actually very little [about] the neuroscience of pain.

Nora Volkow, National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) director

We all like discreteness but sometimes things are not simple.

Bosiljka Tasic, Allen Institute for Brain Science

It’s often said that we don’t really know how anesthesia works. Nothing could be further from the truth. We just haven’t paid attention.

Emery Brown, MIT

This pie in the sky idea [antisense oligonucleotides] from animal models has now moved forward into the clinic.

Timothy Miller, Washington University in St. Louis

Exercise is not like this big green glow around the whole brain. It seems to be circuit specific, and that’s interesting.

Giselle Petzinger, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine

We became very excited that tau antisense oligonucleotides could be a rapid way to get into the clinic.

Angela Cacace, Bristol-Myers Squibb

See “Probing the Role of Tau Protein in Disease

It is incumbent to maintain the free exchange of people and ideas across borders.

David Julius, University of California, San Francisco, before delivering his invited lecture “Natural Products as Probes of the Pain Pathway”

We know nothing about the mechanism of cortical neuron sensitization in chronic pain.

Cheryl Stucky, Medical College of Wisconsin

There have been only a handful of posters on this subject at SfN in recent years, but the number of attendees today attests to the growing popularity of this research topic.

Barbara Sorg, Washington State University Vancouver, introducing a minisymposium on perineuronal nets and neural plasticity

The neuronal DNA methylome has many surprising properties.

Hongjun Song, Johns Hopkins University

Sound is absolutely central to a tremendous amount of human communication.

Nina Kraus, Northwestern University

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