Erasing Epigenetic Marks: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Epigenome

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts who will share their research into editing the epigenome.  Attendees will have an opportunity to interact with the experts, ask questions, and seek advice on topics related to their research.  

By | February 22, 2017

Epigenetic marks come in many forms, from cytosine methylation to histone modification, and the changes they induce are frequently heritable. Modifications caused by traumatic events can be maladaptive in the wake of the stressor, as well as in subsequent generations, but little is known about the process for erasing these epigenetic modifications from the genome. To explore the current progress towards understanding the mechanism(s) behind erasing epigenetic marks, The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts who will share their research into editing the epigenome. Attendees will have an opportunity to interact with the experts, ask questions, and seek advice on topics related to their research.

Topics to be covered:

  • The variety of epigenetic modifications and their influence on gene expression
  • How editing or erasing epigenetic marks might be used in a therapeutic manner

View the Video now

Meet the Speakers:

Alex Drohat, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Maryland School of Medicine

 

 

 

Samuel Hong, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Biochemistry
Emory University School of Medicine

 

 

BioLegend
Biotix
Biotix
Zymo

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Comments

Avatar of: James V. Kohl

James V. Kohl

Posts: 462

April 19, 2017

See also:

IP3-mediated gating mechanism of the IP3 receptor revealed by mutagenesis and X-ray crystallography was reported as:  Atomic structure reveals how cells translate environmental signals

The team identified an amino acid sequence in the leaflet that is conserved in parasites, suggesting structural insights that may assist in drug discovery for these devastating conditions.

Case for the genetic code as a triplet of triplets was reported as: Reading the genetic code depends on context


University of Utah biologists now suggest that connecting amino acids to make proteins in ribosomes, the cell's protein factories, may in fact be influenced by sets of three triplets - a "triplet of triplets" that provide crucial context for the ribosome.

Placing the atomic structure of any functional protein into the context of energy-dependent changes in RNA-mediated amino acid substitutions links natural selection for energy-dependent codon optimaility to all biodiversity. That fact about natural selection refutes neo-Darwinian theories by making the link from virus-driven energy theft to the degradation of messenger RNA the obvious link from mutations to all pathology.

It seems likely that the virucidal anti-entropic effect of sunlight will be linked to the creation and maintenance of the spotless epigenome in this presentation later today.  Hopefully, they will mention that femtosecond blasts of UV light appear to biophysically constrain energy-dependent protein folding chemistry.  For instance, see: UV-Induced Charge Transfer States in DNA Promote Sequence Selective Self-Repair

Popular Now

  1. Publishers’ Legal Action Advances Against Sci-Hub
  2. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  3. Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny
    Daily News Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny

    Out of 25,000 features originally detected by metabolic profiling of E. coli, fewer than 1,000 represent unique metabolites, a study finds.

  4. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
AAAS