Image of the Day: Green Eggs 

Spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) embryos are tinted green by the oxygen-producing algae (Oophila amblystomatis) that grow inside.

By | May 19, 2017

Spotted salamander embryos hatching out of their egg capsules    

ROGER HANGARTER                                                                                                                                                                                         

New research demonstrates that green algae not only grow inside of a spotted salamander egg, but enter cells within its body. Thus far, this is the only example of endosymbiosis in a vertebrate. 

(See J.A. Burns et al., “Transcriptome analysis illuminates the nature of the intracellular interaction in a vertebrate-algal symbiosis,” eLIFE, doi:10.7554/eLife.22054, 2017.)

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