Infographic: Plastic Pollution

Both macroplastic items, such as bags, bottles, and other packaging, and products containing micro- and nanoplastic particles—from cosmetics to paints—contaminate the Earth’s ecosystems.

By | June 1, 2017

Plastics enter the environment from many sources such as accidental losses during waste collection and from landfills, general littering, runoffs, and losses from waste processing. Micro- and nanoplastic particles can also be shed from larger products, such as through abrasion of car tires on the pavement. Some 80 percent of microplastics in wastewater are synthetic fibers, many of which are shed by clothing in the washing machine. Some microplastics (and, likely, nanoplastics, though no studies have attempted to detect such particles) pass into rivers and oceans unhindered by wastewater treatment. Those particles that are captured eventually find their way onto land as part of sewage sludge.

© AL GRANBERG. Source: Nature, 537:488, 2016; Science, 347:768-71, 2015

Read the full story.

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia
  2. German Scientists Resign from Elsevier Journals’ Editorial Boards
  3. Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects
  4. Swapping Cigarettes for Vaping
    The Scientist Swapping Cigarettes for Vaping

    New evidence suggests e-cigarettes are not without risks to human health, but can be useful in getting people to kick their smoking habit.

RayBiotech