Image of the Day: Smell You Later  

Scientists demonstrate that just the right amount of inflammation after an injury to a mouse’s olfactory epithelium is key for regenerating cells important for smell.

By | September 5, 2017

Olfactory basal cells (green) start to regenerate three days following an injury in a normal mouse (image with larger labeled region), while tissue from a mouse engineered with a genetically hindered NF-κB pathway illustrates that without these immune signals, these cells don’t grow back (image with smaller labeled region).ANDREW LANE LAB See M. Chen et al., “Acute inflammation regulates neuroregeneration through the NF-κB pathway in olfactory epithelium,”PNASdoi:10.1073/pnas.1620664114, 2017. 

Add a Comment

Avatar of: You

You

Processing...
Processing...

Sign In with your LabX Media Group Passport to leave a comment

Not a member? Register Now!

LabX Media Group Passport Logo

Popular Now

  1. Publishers’ Legal Action Advances Against Sci-Hub
  2. How Microbes May Influence Our Behavior
  3. The Caterpillar that Cries Wolf
  4. Sexual Touch Promotes Early Puberty
    Daily News Sexual Touch Promotes Early Puberty

    The brains and bodies of young female rats can be accelerated into puberty by the presence of an older male or by stimulation of the genitals.

AAAS