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Dutch Plan Information Institute

AMSTERDAM—A graduate-level institute to train experts in micro-electronics and information science, based on collaboration between industry and government, will open next fall in The Hague. The impetus for the new school, to be called The Hague Advanced School of Applied Informatics, came from a report last year that predicted an annual demand for 2,900 information scientists in this country, where universities could produce at most 1,200. That report, financed by the government and some

By | December 15, 1986

AMSTERDAM—A graduate-level institute to train experts in micro-electronics and information science, based on collaboration between industry and government, will open next fall in The Hague.

The impetus for the new school, to be called The Hague Advanced School of Applied Informatics, came from a report last year that predicted an annual demand for 2,900 information scientists in this country, where universities could produce at most 1,200. That report, financed by the government and some 40 major companies, warned that Europe may fall permanently behind the United States and Japan in information applications unless a graduate training institute was formed.

The report, from the Dutch Initiative Group University of Infomatics, stressed the need to attract English-speaking, top-level tutors from around the world, at salaries much higher than those currently paid to Dutch professors.

The unique venture has received an initial subsidy of 12 million guilders ($5.3 million) from two government departments, Education and Economic Affairs. In return, the government insisted that the new institute be a cooperative venture of existing universities, rather than a private facility outside the regular postgraduate structure.

As a result, the Initiative Group has joined with the universities of Rotterdam, Deift and Leiden, which will be responsible for the quality of the training, the admissions policies and the fees. The original plan called for annual fees of $22,000, a level that would have all but excluded students not sup-ported by a company or organization. The government has said that fees should be “reasonable” so the training is accessible to all qualified applicants.

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