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So They Say

Robert K. Adair has been appointed associate director for high energy and nuclear physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Adair was previously associated with Brookhaven as a graduate student in 1949 and as a researcher for the department of physics from 1953 to 1959. Since that time, he has been a professor of physics at Yale University. Peter H. Quail of the University of Wisconsin will head the first research team appointed to the Plant Gene Expression Center in Albany, Calif. The new cent

January 12, 1987

Robert K. Adair has been appointed associate director for high energy and nuclear physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Adair was previously associated with Brookhaven as a graduate student in 1949 and as a researcher for the department of physics from 1953 to 1959. Since that time, he has been a professor of physics at Yale University.

Peter H. Quail of the University of Wisconsin will head the first research team appointed to the Plant Gene Expression Center in Albany, Calif. The new center was established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the University of California. Also joining the staff are Barbara J. Baker of the Max Planck Institute in West Germany, Michael E. Fromm of Stanford University, Athanasios Theologis of the Washington University School of Medicine, Sheila M. McCormick of Monsanto in St. Louis, and David W. Ow and Sarah C. Hake, both of the University of California.

Clark Hubb, chairman of the Department of Zoology at the University of Texas, Austin, has been named president-elect of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists. The 2,500-member society, which was founded in 1913, is housed within the Florida State Museum at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Boyd R. Strain, professor of botany at Duke University, has been named president-elect of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. He will succeed the current president, W. Donald Duckworth, in November, 1988. Also elected to the 12-member board of directors of the AIBS were Paul G. Risser, chief of the Illinois Natural History Survey; Judith S. Weis, professor of zoology at Rutgers University in Newark; Neal M. Barnett, professor of botany at the University of Maryland; and Laurence D. Moore, professor and chairman of the Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology and Weed Science at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Richard Rosenberg has been named president-elect of the 115,000-member American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Rosenberg most recently was a manager of GA Technologies in San Diego from 1980 until his retirement in 1986.

DEATHS

Robert Morison, former director of medical and natural sciences at the Rockefeller Foundation, died December 2 in Nashua, N.H. Morison joined the Foundation in 1944 and directed the medical and natural sciences division from 1955 to 1964. He then joined Cornell University as a proressor or oioiogy. At the time of his death, Morison had been a visiting professor emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1975. He was 80 years old.

Alexander Hollaender, poineering researcher in ultraviolet and ionizing radiation-induced systems, died in Washington, D.C. on December 6. He was 87 years old. Hollaender directed the biology division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1946 until 1966, when he became a senior research advisor. In 1973 he founded the Council for Research Planning in Biological Sciences and served as its president until his death.

Harrison Brown, former science adviser to Adlai Stevenson and Robert F. Kennedy. During their presidential campaigns, died December 8 in Albuquerque, NM. He was 69 years old. Brown worked as a chemist on the Manhattan Project during World War II. From 1951 to 1977 he was a professor of chemistry at the University of California. Gifford C. Ewing, a physical oceanographer known for his expertise in the fields of internal waves and satellite and shuttle oceanography, died at his home in La Jolla, Calif. on December 10. He was 82 years old. Ewing was a researcher at Scripps Institution, of Oceanography in La Jolla from 1948 to 1966. He then joined the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution until his retirement in 1974.

Stanley Mandeles, 62, professor of biochemistry at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., died of cancer on December 15 at his home in Freehold, N.J. From 1971 to 1981 Mandeles was a professor of chemistry at Douglass College and he chaired the department from 1971 to 1975. His research focused on the role of proteins and nucleic acids in cell differentiation.

AWARDS

Frank J. Low, professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona, received the Rumford Prize of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for his contributions to the field of infrared astronomy. The award was established in 1796 to recognize outstanding contributions to the study of heat or light. Carl.G. Krespan will be presented the American Chemical Society's award for "Creative Work in Fluorine Chemistry" on January 29 at the Eighth Winter Fluorine Conference in St. Petersburg, Fla. Krespan is an exploratory chemist in Du Pont's chemical science division.

Robert D. Maurer received the Industrial Research Institute's 1986 Achievement Award for developing the optical fiber. Maurer is research fellow at Corning Glass Works.

Arvid Wretlind, professor emeritus of human nutrition at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, has been awarded the sixth annual BristonMyers Award for Distinguished Achievement in Nutrition Re-search. The award was established in 1980 and carries a prize of $25,000.

Distinguished Service Awards of the American Anthropological Association recognize exceptional contributions to anthropology. This year's awards were presented at the association's 85th annual meeting to the following individuals: J. Lawrence Angel, a leading authority in forensic anthropology who died in November 1986; Frederica de Laguna, professor emeritus at Bryn Mawr College; and Ward H. Goodenough, professor of anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Five more awards were presented at the AAA's annual meeting. The Alfred Vincent Kidder Award for outstanding work in American Southwest or Middle America archaeology went to lgnacio Bernal, former director of the Instituto Museo Nacional de Antropologia in Mexico. The Solon T. Kimball Award, which recognizes achievement in the development of anthropology as an applied science, was presented to the Culture and Learning Department of Kamehameha Schools in Hawaii. The first annual L. Bryce Boyer Prize for the best paper in psychoanalytic anthropology was awarded to Yoram Bilu of Hebrew University in Jeruselem. T.M. Luhrmann, a research fellow at Christ's College, was given the Stirling Award for contributions to psychological anthropology.

Ernest D. Courant of Brookhaven National Laboratories and the late M. Stanley Livingston, former professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, have received the Enrico Fermi Award of the U.S. Department of Energy. The award recognizes researchers who have dedicated their life's work to nuclear science and it carries a prize of $100,000 for each recipient. Lois Livingston accepted the award for her late husband, who died in August.

The Distinguished Presidential Rank Awards were presented by President Reagan to 44 members of the Senior Executive Service, the organization comprised of 6,132 of the government's top managers. The awards honor outstanding leadership and service. Among the winners were Raymond S. Colladay, associate administrator for aeronautics and space technology at NASA; Frederick K. Goodwin, director of the Division of Intramural Research Programs at the National Institute of Mental Health; Richard Hallgren, assistant administrator for weather services at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Noel W. Hinners, director of the Goddard Space Flight Center; Jerome Karle, chief scientist at the Naval Laboratory for Structure of Matter; and Terry B. Kinney Jr., administrator of the Agricultural Research Service of the Department of Agriculture. Each recipient will receive a check for $20,000.

SALMAGUNDI

Cornell University recently acquired 250 pages of letters written by 19th century scientist Andre Marie Ampere. Written when Ampere was 20 years old in response to queries for technical advice, these are the earliest known letters of the French physicist for whom the electrical measurement amps is named. The letters were discovered in a barn near Lyon, France, where they were stored for nearly two centuries.

Ronald E. McNar, one of the seven astronauts kified in last year's explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, was honored in a memorial dedication of the new space studies building at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. The six-story building will house more than 100,000 square feet of classrooms, laboratories and offices.

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