Drug Agency Hikes Spending For Research

WASHINGTON—The National Institute on Drug Abuse will award more than $155 million in research funds this year. The 77 percent increase over last year is due largely to the President's initiative on drug abuse, and the drug-AIDS connection. Officials said $31 million will be directed toward AIDS research, a 340 percent increase over last year. The administration's $1.5 billion program to combat drugs, which includes funds for military interdiction and anti-crime measures, contains $27 milli

January 12, 1987

WASHINGTON—The National Institute on Drug Abuse will award more than $155 million in research funds this year. The 77 percent increase over last year is due largely to the President's initiative on drug abuse, and the drug-AIDS connection.

Officials said $31 million will be directed toward AIDS research, a 340 percent increase over last year. The administration's $1.5 billion program to combat drugs, which includes funds for military interdiction and anti-crime measures, contains $27 million for drug-related research.

The deadline for grant proposals is February 1 for most fields of inquiry; however, an extension to April 1 has been provided in some areas. Among these are studies on AIDS prevention, cocaine, the pharmacokinetics of drug abuse and genetic vulnerability to drug abuse. (For more information, contact Marvin Snyder, (301) 443-1887, Division of Preclinical Research, or Roy Pickens, Division of Clinical Research, (301) 433-6697.)

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