So They Say

Walter E. Massey, vice president for research and development at Argonne National Laboratory and professor of physics at the University of Chicago, has been elected president-elect of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He will take office on February 19 following the AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago. Massey has been with Argonne since 1979 and prior to that was dean of the college of physics at Brown University. Massey also served on the National Science Board from 1978 to 19

January 26, 1987

Walter E. Massey, vice president for research and development at Argonne National Laboratory and professor of physics at the University of Chicago, has been elected president-elect of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He will take office on February 19 following the AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago. Massey has been with Argonne since 1979 and prior to that was dean of the college of physics at Brown University. Massey also served on the National Science Board from 1978 to 1984. He will succeed president-elect Sheila E. Widnall of MIT, who will become president of the AAAS. Lawrence Bogarad, current president of the Association and professor of biology at Harvard University, will replace Gerald Piel as chairman of the AAAS Board of Directors.
The American Association for the Advancement of Science also elected two new members to its Board of Directors. Beatrix A. Hamburg, professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, City University of New York and Frank von Hippel, senior research physicist at Princeton University, will each serve a four-year term.
Marcel Bardon, a particle physicist who has directed the physics division of the National Science Foundation for the past 15 years, has joined NATO's scientific affairs division in Brussels as deputy to NATO's assistant secretary-general for scientific affairs, Henry Durand of France. Bardon previously served as scientific counselor to the United States delegation to UNESCO.
James A. Krumhansl assumed the office of vice-president of the American Physical Society on January 1. Krumhansl, a Horace M. White Professor of Physics at Cornell University and former editor of he Journal of Applied Physics, will become president-elect of APS in 1988 and president in 1989. He succeeded George Vineyard of Brookhaven National Laboratory, who is now president-elect. Val Fitch of Princeton is the new president.
The American Physical Society also chose Ralph Simmons, professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as chairperson-elect of the nominating committee and elected three new councilors-at-large: Patricia M. Dehmer, a senior scientist at Argonne National Laboratory; Richard R. Freeman, head of the Electromagnetic Phenomena Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, N.J., and Raymond Orbach, professor of physics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Each councilor will serve a four-year term.

DEATHS

Seymour Garson, a retired parasitologist from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, died following a heart attack on December 24 in Washington, D.C. He was 63 years old. Garson headed the medical zoology division of the Army's Tropical Research Medical Laboratory in Puerto Rico before he was transferred to the Washington area and joined the staff of Walter Reed. He retired in 1982. Garson was a member of Sigma Xi, the Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Chemical Society.
Ramon Castroviejo, 82, whose promotion of the idea of "willing your eyes to science" in the 1930s ultimately resulted in the formation of today's eye banks, died January 1 after a brief illness in Madrid. As an early researcher on eye surgery methods, Castroviejo developed the technique of transplanting rectangular corneal "windows" into the eye in 1937. He was born in Spain and graduated from the University of Madrid's medical school before coming to the United States in 1927. He served as a research fellow at the Mayo Clinic and Columbia University and was a professor at the New York University Medical School and Mount Sinai Medical School. Castroviejo returned to Spain following his retirement in 1972.

AWARDS

Reubin Andres, clinical director of the Gerontology Research Center at the National Institute on Aging and professor of medicine at The Johns Hopkins University, received Allied-Signal's second annual Achievement Award in Aging. The award includes a $30,000 cash grant and an additional $30,000 to be presented to an institution chosen by the recipient. Andres was formerly president of the Gerontological Society of America.
Richard Borgens was awarded the 1986 Spinal Cord Society Medal for Services to Humanity for his research on guinea pigs that used weak electric fields to cause regeneration of cut spinal-cord nerves. Borgens is a neuroscientist and associate professor of veterinary anatomy in the Purdue School of Veterinary Medicine.

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