The Global Village of Science

In launching The Scientist, we sought the support of distinguished scientists and science policymakers from around the world. Many agreed to serve as editorial consultants; their names are listed at the left. Many more, who are not formally associated with this newspaper, have enthusiastically aided us behind the scenes. Naturally, in becoming established, our association with notables helps break down the skepticism potential subscribers may harbor about yet another periodical. It also conveys

By | January 26, 1987

In launching The Scientist, we sought the support of distinguished scientists and science policymakers from around the world. Many agreed to serve as editorial consultants; their names are listed at the left. Many more, who are not formally associated with this newspaper, have enthusiastically aided us behind the scenes.

Naturally, in becoming established, our association with notables helps break down the skepticism potential subscribers may harbor about yet another periodical. It also conveys a seriousness of purpose and a high standard of quality. While we do in fact derive great benefit from such "acceptance by association," this was not our prime reason for inviting colleagues to serve as editorial advisers. Our advisers were not invited to serve merely as passive figureheads, who lend us only the luster of their names. Rather, we expect they will actively participate in shaping The Scientist, as many already have in writing book reviews and articles, and in leading us to relevant sources and hard-to-reach experts.

Our advisers represent many areas of the world—from New York to Melbourne, Stanford to Shanghai, Charlotte to Columbo, and so on. We were eager to include representatives of Third-World science on our board. We expect to add representatives of other regions and nations, such as Japan, the Soviet Union, France, and Africa, among others, to bring even greater breadth to our group of editorial consultants. Given the far-flung distribution of the group, you'll understand why we won't all sit down together in a conference room with any regularity. That may be for the best, for we rely on our advisers to be "in the field" as our eyes and ears around the world.

Our advisers, moreover, represent many disciplines—physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, etc., and, in the social sciences, science policy, sociology, and the history of science. We are currently studying ISI's citation database to help us obtain a balanced representation of scientists' interests and activities, which, owing to the growth and ever-changing nature of science, is of continuing concern.

While our advisers are largely well-established figures, we are also seeking the voices of the younger generation, who have special concerns and perspectives. This new generation of science professionals will find a forum in The Scientist.

As might be expected, such a diverse group as we have gathered holds a diversity of opinions. Our advisers will from time to time disagree with opinions expressed in these pages, so I want to emphasize that the presence of their names does not constitute an endorsement of everything we print. I imagine that when they disagree, you'll be reading their views in our Feedback or Opinion pages.

The participation of these colleagues gives me encouragement and assures me that The Scientist will represent the concerns of science professionals everywhere.

For their participation, I am indeed grateful. Their willingness to assist us reflects the openness and cooperative nature of science itself. In turn, publications like The Scientist help keep open the lines of communication among scientists worldwide.

Eugene Garfield is Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of  The Scientist,
and President of the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

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