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Royal Society Medals and Awards

Sir Francis Graham-Smith, Astronomer Royal and director of Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratory, for his contributions to radio and optical astronomy. Sir Eric Denton, secretary of the Marine Biological Association, for his contributions to the physiology of marine animals, to marine biology in general, and his leadership of U.K. marine science. G.V.R. Born, Emeritus Professor of Pharmacology, University of London, Kings College, to honor his many contributions to the physiology, pathology and

September 7, 1987

Sir Francis Graham-Smith, Astronomer Royal and director of Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratory, for his contributions to radio and optical astronomy.

Sir Eric Denton, secretary of the Marine Biological Association, for his contributions to the physiology of marine animals, to marine biology in general, and his leadership of U.K. marine science.

G.V.R. Born, Emeritus Professor of Pharmacology, University of London, Kings College, to honor his many contributions to the physiology, pathology and pharmacology of platelets.

Six others were also recognized as recipients of 1987 awards and medals:
M.A. Ford, technical director of Perkin-Elmer Ltd., received the annual Mullard Award, which honors contributions to the advancement of science, engineering or technology that lead directly to national prosperity in the United Kingdom. Ford was cited for his work toward developing and designing analytical products in the field of infrared spectroscopy.

George William Gray, G.S. Grant Professor of Chemistry, University of Hull, was presented the Leverhulme Medal in recognition of his many contributions to the field of liquid crystals.

Robert Hill, former staff member of the Agricultural Research Council, received the Copley Medal for his pioneering contributions to determining the nature and mechanism of the main pathway of electron transport in photosynthesis. The award was established in 1731 to honor outstanding philosophical research.

A.J. Jeffreys, reader in genetics at the University of Leicester, received the Davy Medal to honor his contributions to the chemistry of human DNA, especially his discovery of hypervariable satellites in the human genome.

Michael Pepper, senior research fellow at General Electric Co. and fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, was awarded the Hughes Medal for his studies of the fundamental properties of semiconductors, which elucidated such properties as electron localizatlon and the quantum Hall effects.

G.K. Radda of the British Heart Foundation, and professor of molecular cardiology at the University of Oxford, received the Buchanan Medal for developing high resolution NMR spectroscopy for the study of cellular -energetics and cellular enzymology.

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