Lord Foundation Honors Six As Science Leaders

This year’s honors will go to Isaac Asimov, James Buchanan, Jay Forrester, Edwin Land, Herman Mark, and James Watson at Lord Corporation’s Third National Symposium on Technology and Society, to be held this week at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Upon announcing the award recipients, Lord Corp. chairman Donald M. Alstadt noted that each of them “has amply demonstrated through their innovative processes” that “the growth of knowledge

October 17, 1988

This year’s honors will go to Isaac Asimov, James Buchanan, Jay Forrester, Edwin Land, Herman Mark, and James Watson at Lord Corporation’s Third National Symposium on Technology and Society, to be held this week at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass.

Upon announcing the award recipients, Lord Corp. chairman Donald M. Alstadt noted that each of them “has amply demonstrated through their innovative processes” that “the growth of knowledge and the growth of social wealth and human living standards are inseparable.”

Author Isaac Asimov is the award winner in the “Increased Understanding” category for developing and promoting “creative techniques of writing and communication that foster human and social understanding of science, technology, literature, the arts, and a diversified spectrum of human activity:

James M. Buchanan, head of the Center for Study of Public Choice at George Mason University, is the winner in the “Resource Allocation” category for his work focusing on so-called “contractarian” decision processes as a basic approach to the economic and political progress of social institutions.

Jay W. Forrester, Germeshausen Professor at MIT and director of the System Dynamics Program in the Alfred P. Sloan School of Management, receives the prize in the “Functional Analysis” category for his “pioneering research, development, and engineer- ing of magnetic core memory devices; for pioneering research into the field of system dynamics; and for elucidation of the counterintuitive behavior of social and socio-economic institutions.”

Winners in the “Material Progress” category are Edwin H. Land, founder of Polaroid Corp., and Herman F. Mark, Dean Emeritus at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. Land—inventor of the Polaroid camera—is being honored “for innovative research in the field of synthetic chemistry and optics.” And Mark is cited for his seven decades of pioneering research and education in the field of X-ray diffraction.

James D. Watson, famous for his trailblazing work with the double helix structure of the DNA molecule, is the recipient of the “Basic Needs” category award. He is being honored for his “diligent application” of this discovery, which has been fundamental in the advancement of the field of molecular biology. He is currently director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on Long Island, N.Y.

The Ajinomoto Co., Tokyo, has elected Maxwell Gordon to the position of board chairman and chief executive officer of the firm’s subsidiary, Lenti-Chemico Pharmaceutical Laboratory Inc., a new company business unit located in Teaneck, N.J. The subsidiary initially will have the task of developing lentinan and its derivatives in the United States for treating cancer and AIDS. Lentinan is a natural product of mushrooms that is being tested as an immune system stimulant. A Ph.D. in organic chemistry, Gordon served for 18 years as senior vice president of the Science and Technology Group of the Bristol-Myers Co., New York.

The American Mathematical Society recently awarded three $4,000 Leroy P. Steele Prizes at its Centennial Celebration in Providence, R.I. The 1988 Steele Prize for Expository Writing was given to Sigurdur Helgason of MIT for his books Differential Geometry and Symmetric Spaces (1962), Differential Geometry, Lie Groups, and Symmetric Spaces (1978), and Groups and Geometric Analysis (1984). Gian-Carlo Rota, also of MIT, was awarded the 1988 Steele Prize for a Fundamental Paper for his “On the foundations of combinatorial theory, I. Theory of Möbius Functions,” which appeared in Zeitschrift fur Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie und Verwandte Gebiete, (Volume 2, 340-368, 1964).

Deane Montgomery, professor emeritus of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., received the 1988 Steele Career Prize for his “lasting impact” on American mathematics. He is one of the founders of the modem theory of transformation groups and is particularly known for his contributions to the solution of Hilbert’s fifth problem.

Axel Ulrich, staff scientist at Genentech and the first researcher to clone the insulin gene, has been appointed director at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Munich, Germany. In his new role, Ullrich will concentrate on studies of the molecular basis of growth control and related pathological disorders, including cancer. “We are delighted that he can fulfill his long-term plan to return to academia while continuing a productive relationship with the company,” says chief executive officer Robert A. Swanson.

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