About Top 10 Innovations

Every year since 2008, The Scientist has canvassed the life-science community to find out which newly released products are having the biggest impact on research. After collecting submissions from companies and individuals, we put the new innovations before a carefully selected panel of expert, independent judges. Our judges rank the tools, techniques, methodologies, software, and products according to their potential to foster rapid advances or address specific problems in their respective fields. The 10 products that rate the highest in our judges' opinions are featured in an article that forms the centerpiece of our December issue. Our goal is to identify those products and services that are poised to revolutionize research and advance scientific knowledge. Check out past year’s winners and stay tuned to learn about this year's winners in the December issue of The Scientist.

 

Recent Features

 

Top 10 Innovations, 2015

The newst life-science products making waves in labs and clinics

By The Scientist Staff

 

Top 10 Innovations, 2014

The list of the year’s best new products contains both perennial winners and innovative newcomers.

By The Scientist Staff
 

Top 10 Innovations, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

By The Scientist Staff

 

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