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April 25, 2013
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Happy Birthday, DNA!

Today marks the 60th anniversary of the publication in Nature of three papers describing the structure of DNA. We celebrate this landmark discovery with a poster outlining the history of the field, a webinar series looking at the future of DNA research, and this collection of our recent coverage of all things DNA.

image: Celebrating 60 years of the Double Helix

Celebrating 60 Years of the Double Helix

By Dan Cossins

Genome Biology speaks to a scientist involved in the discovery of the structure of DNA, and asks modern geneticists to highlight the key advances that have followed.

image: Targeting DNA

Targeting DNA

By Jef Akst

After 20 years of high-profile failure, gene therapy is finally well on its way to clinical approval.

image: Sons of Next Gen

Sons of Next Gen

By Tia Ghose

New innovations could bring tailored, fast, and cheap sequencing to the masses.

image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By Kevin V. Morris

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organismís lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

image: An Epi Phenomenon

An Epi Phenomenon

By Karen Hopkin

While exploring the genetics of a rare type of tumor, Stephen Baylin discovered an epigenetic modification that occurs in most every canceróa finding heís helping bring to the clinic.

image: Telomeres in Disease

Telomeres in Disease

By Rodrigo Calado and Neal Young

Telomeres have been linked to numerous diseases over the years, but how exactly short telomeres cause diseases and how medicine can prevent telomere erosion are still up for debate.

image: High-Tech Choir Master

High-Tech Choir Master

By Karen Hopkin

Elaine Mardis can make DNA sequencers sing, generating genome data that shed light on evolution and disease.

image: Charting the Course

Charting the Course

By Jeffrey M. Perkel

Three gene jockeys share their thoughts on past and future tools of the trade.

image: Sequence Analysis 101

Sequence Analysis 101

By Jeffrey M. Perkel

A newbieís guide to crunching next-generation sequencing data

image: Hacking the Genome

Hacking the Genome

By Karen Hopkin

In pondering genome structure and function, evolutionary geneticist Laurence Hurst has arrived at some unanticipated conclusions about how natural selection has molded our DNA.

Opinions

Researchers opine about the role of genomics in modern science and medicine.

cosmin4000, Istockphoto

What Is the Human Genome?

By Ken Weiss

The human genome that researchers sequenced at the turn of the century doesn't really exist as we know it.

Opinion: Talking Genomics

Talking Genomics

By Trevor Quirk

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

image: Genomic Inequality

Genomic Inequality

By Todd Smith and Sandra Porter

To successfully use a patientís genetic makeup in a clinical setting, we must better understand the incredible diversity of human genomes.

image: Genomics-Informed Pathology

Genomics-Informed Pathology

By Dennis P. Wall and Peter J. Tonellato

Twenty-first century lab reports will include test results read by a new breed of pathologist.

image: Opinion: Genomics in the Clinic

Genomics in the Clinic

By Richard Resnick

Next-generation sequencing diagnostics are already being used, and patients are ready.

Sequencing Genomes

Read about the species that have been recently sequenced.

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By Kate Yandell

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode speciesí genomes

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By Dan Cossins

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode speciesí genomes

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By Dan Cossins

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode speciesí genomes

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By Dan Cossins

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode speciesí genomes

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By Beth Marie Mole

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode speciesí genomes

Sponsored Webinars

Educational videos and online seminars

image: Leveraging NGS Data to Unlock the Biological Mysteries in Cancer and Diabetes

Leveraging NGS Data to Unlock the Biological Mysteries in Cancer and Diabetes

Biological interpretation of thousands of variants is a bottleneck in extracting valuable insights from DNA sequencing studies. This webinar will address how these limitations can largely be overcome by using more sophisticated informatics tools that can help interpret the biology accurately and in more detail.

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