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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

By Ashley Yeager | February 9, 2018

The technique could combat infertility, but it's still not clear whether these eggs are normal and functional.

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Contributors

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

The new database includes data from 27,000 samples collected at sites ranging from Alaskan permafrost to the ocean floor.

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Puerto Rico’s Cayo Santiago has hosted decades of research in cognition, primatology, immunization, and other areas.

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image: War Dance of the Honeybee

War Dance of the Honeybee

By Karl Gruber | February 1, 2018

One species has developed a novel waggle to warn about invading wasps.

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Pectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Bees Under Attack

Bees Under Attack

By The Scientist Staff | January 31, 2018

Japanese honeybees (Apis cerana japonica) respond to an attack by a Vespa mandarinia wasp.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Swearing is Good for You</em>

Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for You

By Emma Byrne | January 24, 2018

In chapter 1, “The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,” author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.

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