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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

The new database includes data from 27,000 samples collected at sites ranging from Alaskan permafrost to the ocean floor.

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Puerto Rico’s Cayo Santiago has hosted decades of research in cognition, primatology, immunization, and other areas.

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image: War Dance of the Honeybee

War Dance of the Honeybee

By Karl Gruber | February 1, 2018

One species has developed a novel waggle to warn about invading wasps.

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image: Bees Under Attack

Bees Under Attack

By The Scientist Staff | January 31, 2018

Japanese honeybees (Apis cerana japonica) respond to an attack by a Vespa mandarinia wasp.

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image: California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

By Catherine Offord | January 15, 2018

Researchers suspect the source of the toxins may be some of the state’s 50,000 or so marijuana farms.

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image: Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

By Ruth Williams | January 10, 2018

The near-complete feminization of northern Great Barrier Reef sea turtles has been blamed on climate change.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By Steve Graff | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects

Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects

By Anna Azvolinsky | October 18, 2017

A 27-year-long study finds insect biomass has declined by about 75 percent. 

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image: Image of the Day: Bad House Guest

Image of the Day: Bad House Guest

By The Scientist Staff | October 9, 2017

Parasitoid wasps inoculate other insects with their eggs, and their offspring then grow to feed on their "homes," effectively sucking the life out of their dying hosts.

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