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image: Image of the Day: Van Gogh Microscopy

Image of the Day: Van Gogh Microscopy

By | January 10, 2018

Scientists identify the cells that give rise to the soft tissue cancer rhabdomyosarcoma. 

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image: Photos of the Year

Photos of the Year

By | December 25, 2017

From a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist’s favorite images from 2017.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Fly 

Image of the Day: Fragile Fly 

By | December 7, 2017

Researchers examine the effects on the fruit fly intestine of the protein responsible for Fragile X syndrome in humans. 

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image: Image of the Day: Tissue Feast

Image of the Day: Tissue Feast

By | December 5, 2017

Researchers are taking a close look at the bacterium that causes listeriosis disease.  

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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image: Image of the Day: Gut Sweet Home

Image of the Day: Gut Sweet Home

By | November 22, 2017

Researchers describe more than 200 species of tapeworm from a decade-long collection of tapeworms from the digestive systems of animals around the world. 

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image: Image of the Day: Butterfly Wing Scents

Image of the Day: Butterfly Wing Scents

By | November 13, 2017

In Heliconius butterflies, researchers discover the importance of a male wing structure in female choice. 

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image: Image of the Day: Fruit Fly Factory 

Image of the Day: Fruit Fly Factory 

By | November 10, 2017

A fruit fly ovary can contain up to 20 eggs at a time. 

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image: Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  

Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  

By | November 8, 2017

Scientists have developed a computer tomography device capable of visualizing objects at nanoscale. 

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image: Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

By | October 31, 2017

Researchers have used a modified rabies virus and fluorescent proteins to tag individual nerve cells in the mouse visual cortex. 

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