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image: Opinion: Biobanking Has a Consent Dilemma

Opinion: Biobanking Has a Consent Dilemma

By | July 25, 2017

Is the deep uncertainty surrounding fundamental legal and ethical norms putting biobanks in a precarious position? 

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Two reports raise concerns about privacy and proper consent during a controversial data-sharing agreement, but find that only the National Health Service broke the law.

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image: Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

By | February 16, 2017

Family members of Lacks, the donor behind the widely used HeLa cell line, are planning to sue Johns Hopkins University.

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image: Oprah to Star in Henrietta Lacks Movie

Oprah to Star in Henrietta Lacks Movie

By | May 3, 2016

She will also be an executive producer on the HBO Films project, which is based on a 2010 book about the life of Henrietta Lacks.

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The federal agency publishes a brief note alleging another ethical breach by former Karolinska Institute researcher Paolo Macchiarini.

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image: Review: Sacred Stories, Genetic Privacy Collide

Review: Sacred Stories, Genetic Privacy Collide

By | August 17, 2015

Cherished myths and merciless facts clash in a one-act play.

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image: Nordic Gene Study Requires Consent

Nordic Gene Study Requires Consent

By | June 24, 2013

A company has been ordered to stop estimating Icelanders’ genotypes and linking them to hospital records.

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US watchdog suspends plans to discipline researchers who failed to disclose the full risks of an experimental trial conducted with premature infants.

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image: What Should Patients Be Told About Genetic Risk?

What Should Patients Be Told About Genetic Risk?

By | May 7, 2013

Experts disagree on how doctors should reveal incidental findings in patients’ DNA sequences.

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image: Not-So-Informed Consent

Not-So-Informed Consent

By | June 21, 2012

Growing databanks are invaluable to biomedical researchers, but patients are often unaware of what their information is used for.

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