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image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  


In an unusual evolutionary twist, local stick spiders have come up with an almost identical repertoire of color morphs in multiple locations.


image: EPA’s Scott Pruitt Doesn’t Buy Evolution

EPA’s Scott Pruitt Doesn’t Buy Evolution

By Kerry Grens | March 5, 2018

In audio files from 2005, the future Administrator of the EPA said there’s a lack of “sufficient scientific facts” to back the theory.


image: Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

Researchers are looking to proteins to explore the biology of ancient organisms, from medieval humans all the way back to dinosaurs.


image: Image of the Day: Size Matters

Image of the Day: Size Matters

By The Scientist Staff | February 23, 2018

The male proboscis monkey’s large nose probably evolved in response to female preference and competition between males.

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image: Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

By Ashley Yeager | February 23, 2018

Dampening the immune response to stay up in the air may have helped bats become tolerant to viral infections.


image: Nobel Prize–Winning Biologist Dies

Nobel Prize–Winning Biologist Dies

By Catherine Offord | February 20, 2018

Günter Blobel, known for his work on the signal hypothesis of protein targeting, has died from cancer at age 81.

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A closer moon and ideal coastal conditions for tide pool formation may have started the evolutionary transition of tetrapods.

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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

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