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Tissue recipients were treated as “guinea pigs,” says investigation leader.

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image: So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist

So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist

By | August 18, 2017

Biomedical engineer Kyle Quinn fends off a frenzied Internet mob after being wrongly identified as a Charlottesville protester.

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image: First Organ-Specific Tissue Sheets

First Organ-Specific Tissue Sheets

By | August 9, 2017

The material is durable, flexible, and can serve as a scaffold for cell growth, a study shows.

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image: Skin Graft-based Gene Therapy Treats Diabetes in Mice

Skin Graft-based Gene Therapy Treats Diabetes in Mice

By | August 4, 2017

A small patch of engineered cells makes an enzyme that stimulates insulin release.

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image: Engineered Human Liver Tissue Grows in Mice

Engineered Human Liver Tissue Grows in Mice

By | July 19, 2017

Tissue “seeds” made up of three cell types and patterned onto a scaffold develop into complex structures with some organ function, researchers show.

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Four products have already qualified for the regenerative medicine advanced therapy (RMAT) designation that provides extra interactions with the agency, and sooner.

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image: Hairy Skin from Stem Cells

Hairy Skin from Stem Cells

By | April 5, 2016

Researchers create lab-grown mouse skin complete with hair follicles and sweat glands.

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image: Next Generation: Cell-Covered Fastener

Next Generation: Cell-Covered Fastener

By | August 28, 2015

Scientists have developed an interlocking cell scaffold for easy building and dismantling of tissues.

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image: Desktop Human

Desktop Human

By | December 1, 2014

Meet the researchers behind ATHENA, the project that aims to create a system of linked model human organs that may revolutionize drug development.

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image: Homo Minutus

Homo Minutus

By | December 1, 2014

A miniature platform with multiple organ-on-a-chip constructs aims to speed up drug discovery—and create better transplants for patients.

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