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Rather than getting a gene for its original function, a horizontal gene transfer provides the raw material for evolutionary innovation.

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Drug-free environments, such as a designated ward in a hospital, might reduce the strength of selection for resistance.

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image: Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

By The Scientist Staff | April 24, 2018

A new species of ant discovered in Borneo fends off invaders with a uniquely suicidal strategy.

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image: Children With Malaria Smell More Attractive to Mosquitoes

Children With Malaria Smell More Attractive to Mosquitoes

By Shawna Williams | April 17, 2018

The parasite changes people’s scent, primarily due to an increase in aldehydes.

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A new report estimates that 95 percent of people live in areas with dangerously high levels of fine particulate matter such as dust and soot.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

By The Scientist Staff | April 4, 2018

Proteins and RNA aggregate into “membraneless organelles” due to liquid-liquid phase separation.

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image: OSU Professor Falsified Data on Eight Papers, Resigns

OSU Professor Falsified Data on Eight Papers, Resigns

By Catherine Offord | April 2, 2018

Ching-Shih Chen’s research involved anticancer therapeutics that were being tested in clinical trials.

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image: Genetic Mutation Linked to Cot Death

Genetic Mutation Linked to Cot Death

By Catherine Offord | March 29, 2018

Alterations to a protein involved in breathing may help explain some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, a study finds.

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image: Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

By The Scientist Staff | March 21, 2018

Volvox barberi actively organize themselves into large colonies that optimize space.

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image: Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

By Catherine Offord | March 20, 2018

A new study finds that more than 200 human-targeted, non-antibiotic drugs inhibit the growth of bacterial species that make up part of the human microbiome.

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