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image: Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?

Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?

By | December 11, 2017

Small trials using younger donors and elderly recipients hint that mesenchymal stem cell transfers might reduce frailty. 

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The nine plaintiffs allege the university’s actions put women at risk.

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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Jane on the Brain</em>

Book Excerpt from Jane on the Brain

By | December 1, 2017

In chapter 3, “The Sense of Sensibility,” author Wendy Jones uses scenes from one of Jane Austen’s most celebrated novels to illustrate the functioning of the body’s stress response system.

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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image: Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience

Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience

By | December 1, 2017

Jane Austen can teach us a lot about how our brains handle uncertainty.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By | December 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Dolly’s Cloning Likely Didn’t Cause Premature Aging

Dolly’s Cloning Likely Didn’t Cause Premature Aging

By | November 24, 2017

A new analysis of Dolly’s skeleton suggests the cloned sheep’s arthritis did not lead to her death. 

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image: Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate

Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate

By | November 17, 2017

Shorter telomere length is widely considered a manifestation of stress in young children, but the results of a new study find it’s more complicated than that.  

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image: Genetic Mutation in Amish Linked to Longer Life

Genetic Mutation in Amish Linked to Longer Life

By | November 16, 2017

Mutations in both copies of SERPINE1 can result in blood clotting disorders, but carriers might enjoy longer lifespan and health benefits. 

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