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image: Renowned Cancer Theorist Dies

Renowned Cancer Theorist Dies

By | July 13, 2016

Alfred Knudson, who formulated the “two-hit” theory on the origins of cancer, has passed away at age 93.

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image: Chromatin Conformation Computed

Chromatin Conformation Computed

By | October 19, 2015

By manipulating DNA sequences that guide genome-folding, researchers confirm an existing model of chromatin structure inside the nucleus.

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A National Cancer Institute model forecasts a marked increase in estrogen receptor-positive tumors among older women by 2030.

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image: Study: Ebola Predictions Overstated

Study: Ebola Predictions Overstated

By | April 2, 2015

Most forecasting methods used to predict the extent of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa overestimated the epidemic’s reach, an updated analysis shows.

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image: Opinion: Calculating Cancer

Opinion: Calculating Cancer

By | January 6, 2014

How a growing partnership between oncologists and mathematicians is moving research forward.

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image: May the Best Model Win

May the Best Model Win

By | June 4, 2013

Computational challenges are tapping the collective wisdom of the scientific community to solve medicine’s biggest problems.

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image: Factoring in Face Time

Factoring in Face Time

By | June 1, 2013

How the study of human social interactions is helping researchers understand the spread of diseases like influenza and HIV

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image: Early Warning Signs

Early Warning Signs

By | October 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in Ecology

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