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image: Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned

Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned

By Abby Olena | April 25, 2018

Unsuccessful attempts to reproduce the results of a 2015 study reporting that C. elegans orient themselves by Earth’s magnetic field spark debate among researchers.

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image: Free Divers From Southeast Asia Evolved Bigger Spleens

Free Divers From Southeast Asia Evolved Bigger Spleens

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 19, 2018

The adaptation gives better endurance to the Bajau people, known as sea nomads, by increasing spleen size and, in turn, boosting the number of oxygenated red blood cells when diving.  

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image: Image of the Day: Nanobot Schematic

Image of the Day: Nanobot Schematic

By The Scientist Staff | April 13, 2018

A magnetically controlled device could have applications in studies of cell biology and biophysics.

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A group of around 300 whales produced 184 distinct songs over just a few years, according to a new study.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

By The Scientist Staff | April 4, 2018

Proteins and RNA aggregate into “membraneless organelles” due to liquid-liquid phase separation.

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Social insects kill infected individuals for the benefit of the colony—and now a study has shown how they know who’s sick.

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A controversial hypothesis suggests that jellyfish may one day rule the oceans, and Mola mola may tell us if we are approaching a tipping point.

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The neuronal coverings that mediate synaptic changes are involved in everything from memory to psychiatric disorders, affecting autism, Alzheimer’s, and addiction.

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image: Image of the Day: Pseudomonas Autophagy

Image of the Day: Pseudomonas Autophagy

By The Scientist Staff | March 30, 2018

Researchers identify antibacterial functions of cell death in Arabidopsis when the plant is infected with Pseudomonas.  

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image: Merino Sheep Provide Clue to Curly Hair

Merino Sheep Provide Clue to Curly Hair

By Catherine Offord | March 23, 2018

The cells on one side of each wool fiber are longer than the cells on the other, researchers find. 

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