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The switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.

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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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image: Infographic: The Various Forms of Methylated DNA

Infographic: The Various Forms of Methylated DNA

By | September 1, 2017

To expand the basic nucleotide alphabet, many species modify their DNA with epigenetic marks.

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image: The Role of DNA Base Modifications

The Role of DNA Base Modifications

By | September 1, 2017

Researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface of how several newly recognized epigenetic changes function in the genome.

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image: Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

By | February 1, 2017

Unlike animals, plants stably pass on their DNA methylomes from one generation to the next. The resulting gene silencing likely hides an abundance of phenotypic variation.

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image: Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

By | February 1, 2017

Multiple molecular mechanisms keep plant DNA methylation in order.

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image: Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

By | January 11, 2017

Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.

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image: Characterizing the Imprintome

Characterizing the Imprintome

By | January 1, 2017

Three techniques for identifying the collection of maternal and paternal genes silenced in offspring

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image: Methylation Maestro

Methylation Maestro

By | January 1, 2017

After initially discovering that DNA methylation represses transcription, Howard Cedar continues to explore how the epigenetic mark regulates gene expression.

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image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

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