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The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.

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New research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.

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image: “Out of Africa” Theory Gets the Genomic Treatment

“Out of Africa” Theory Gets the Genomic Treatment

By | September 26, 2016

A trio of genetic studies on seldom-studied indigenous populations points to a single wave of migration as humanity wandered from its evolutionary homeland into the rest of the world.

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image: New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

New Timeline for Homo naledi

By | July 6, 2016

The ancient human may have lived around 900,000 years ago—much more recently than first estimated.

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image: Ancient Y Chromosome Analyzed

Ancient Y Chromosome Analyzed

By | April 7, 2016

In-depth analysis of the Neanderthal Y chromosome offers insights into the ancient hominins’ split with modern humans.

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image: Dating the Origin of Us

Dating the Origin of Us

By | November 1, 2013

Theoretical anthropogeny seeks to understand how Homo sapiens rose to a position of global dominance.

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image: Suspect Sasquatch Sequencing

Suspect Sasquatch Sequencing

By | November 28, 2012

Without publishing any data, a Texas-based forensic company claims to have sequenced the genome of Bigfoot.

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image: Brain Evolution at a Distance

Brain Evolution at a Distance

By | December 6, 2011

Gene expression controlled from afar may have spurred the spurt in brain evolution that led to modern humans.

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