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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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image: Passing the Torch

Passing the Torch

By | December 1, 2017

Looking back, looking forward

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The switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.

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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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image: Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

By | November 28, 2017

Scientists study the development of scales in skate embryos. 

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Image of the Day: Microbes on Fake Mars

Image of the Day: Microbes on Fake Mars

By | October 18, 2017

By simulating the structure and composition of Mars’s rocky materials, scientists observe how the metal-eating, extreme environment–inhabiting microbe Metallosphaera sedula could alter extraterrestrial environments.

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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