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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Image of the Day: Microbes on Fake Mars

Image of the Day: Microbes on Fake Mars

By | October 18, 2017

By simulating the structure and composition of Mars’s rocky materials, scientists observe how the metal-eating, extreme environment–inhabiting microbe Metallosphaera sedula could alter extraterrestrial environments.

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Image of the Day: Rainbow Gut

Image of the Day: Rainbow Gut

By | October 11, 2017

Rather than organizing into easily defined compartments, different microbes mix and intermingle within the mouse gut, scientists find.

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image: Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

By | August 3, 2017

The paper describing the gene-editing method is retracted.

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image: Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

By | June 26, 2017

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus begins to grow biofilms as it develops into a larger intertwined network.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

By | May 10, 2017

Fossilized gas bubbles, formed from being trapped by microbial biofilms, provide the oldest signature of life in terrestrial hot springs.

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The plumes that erupt through the cracks on the icy exterior of one of Saturn’s moons contain molecular hydrogen, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Sharp Shooters

Image of the Day: Sharp Shooters

By | April 4, 2017

Single-celled dinoflagellates (Polykrikos) use harpoon-like organelles to hunt and capture prey.

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