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image: A Brush with Inheritance, 1878

A Brush with Inheritance, 1878

By Catherine Offord | February 1, 2018

Lampbrush chromosomes, first observed in the 19th century, still offer an unparalleled glimpse into how genetic information is organized in the cell.

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Pauses may help cells fine-tune gene expression.

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image: Infographic: The Various Forms of Methylated DNA

Infographic: The Various Forms of Methylated DNA

By Skirmantas Kriaucionis | September 1, 2017

To expand the basic nucleotide alphabet, many species modify their DNA with epigenetic marks.

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image: The Role of DNA Base Modifications

The Role of DNA Base Modifications

By Skirmantas Kriaucionis | September 1, 2017

Researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface of how several newly recognized epigenetic changes function in the genome.

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image: The RNA Age: A Primer

The RNA Age: A Primer

By Ruth Williams | May 11, 2017

Our guide to all known forms of RNA, from cis-NAT to vault RNA and everything in between.

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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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image: Starvation Response Triggers Melanoma Invasion

Starvation Response Triggers Melanoma Invasion

By Catherine Offord | April 1, 2017

Through similar mechanisms, amino acid depletion in culture and cytokine activity in the tumor microenvironment prompt cancer cells to metastasize.

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Genes linked to embryonic development, stress, and cancer are increasingly transcribed into RNA after these animals die.

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image: Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin

Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin

By Ruth Williams | January 1, 2017

See how researchers visualize regions of active genes.

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image: Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

By Daniel H. Lin and André Hoelz | December 1, 2016

Solving a long-standing structural puzzle will open the door to understanding one of the cell’s most enigmatic machines.

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