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image: Image of the Day: Hold My Brood

Image of the Day: Hold My Brood

By The Scientist Staff | May 9, 2018

Cuckoo catfish trick cichlids into caring for their eggs in a strategy known as brood parasitism.

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image: Image of the Day: Bad House Guest

Image of the Day: Bad House Guest

By The Scientist Staff | October 9, 2017

Parasitoid wasps inoculate other insects with their eggs, and their offspring then grow to feed on their "homes," effectively sucking the life out of their dying hosts.

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image: Image of the Day: Better Together

Image of the Day: Better Together

By The Scientist Staff | October 5, 2017

When it comes to thwarting roundworms, scientists find that combining four antiparasitic drugs in smaller doses packs a greater punch than the four drugs alone.

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image: Study: Bumblebee Species Declining Worldwide

Study: Bumblebee Species Declining Worldwide

By Aggie Mika | July 20, 2017

The first global evaluation of populations demonstrates that certain species are diminishing considerably.

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The plant Lophophytum pilfers mitochondrial genes from the species it parasitizes.

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image: Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

Study: One Wasp Takes Control of Another

By Jef Akst | January 25, 2017

Crypt keeper wasps appear to command crypt gall wasps to dig exit tunnels on their behalf.

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By Jef Akst | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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image: NYC Rats Harbor Plague Fleas

NYC Rats Harbor Plague Fleas

By Bob Grant | March 3, 2015

Researchers find Oriental rat fleas, the insects that can carry plague bacteria, on New York City-dwelling rodents.

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image: The Ultimate Game of Cat and Mouse

The Ultimate Game of Cat and Mouse

By Erin Weeks | September 18, 2013

Toxoplasma gondii seems to cause hard-wired changes in the brains of mice that persist even after the parasite is gone.

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image: Ants on Burglar Watch

Ants on Burglar Watch

By Kate Yandell | May 22, 2013

An ant species that lives on a carnivorous pitcher plant keeps nutrient thieves from escaping by eating them.

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