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The report provides evidence that goes against concerns that Monsanto’s popular herbicide, Roundup, is carcinogenic. 

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Agriculture faculty members allege funding from industry organizations is tied to their employment status.

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Pesticide Residues Linked to Unsuccessful IVF

Pesticide Residues Linked to Unsuccessful IVF

By | October 30, 2017

Women who ate more produce known to harbor pesticides were less likely to succeed with fertility treatment than women who ate fewer of these fruits and vegetables.

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Plantings of non-GM refuges counter the development of resistance.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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