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image: Image of the Day: Minions of the Cicada 

Image of the Day: Minions of the Cicada 

By | January 9, 2018

Scientists study the unusual genome evolution of the bacteria that live within a genus of cicadas. 

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image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

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image: Image of the Day: Virus Spacecraft 

Image of the Day: Virus Spacecraft 

By | January 5, 2018

Researchers reconstruct images of a virus that infects Escherichia coli bacteria.

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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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image: Image of the Day: Hunter Platelets 

Image of the Day: Hunter Platelets 

By | December 19, 2017

Researchers explore how blood platelets sweep bacteria into aggregate bundles at sites of infection to help phagocytic cells dispose of them. 

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image: Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

By | December 18, 2017

Entomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years. 

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Image of the Day: Tissue Feast

Image of the Day: Tissue Feast

By | December 5, 2017

Researchers are taking a close look at the bacterium that causes listeriosis disease.  

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image: Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

By | December 4, 2017

Factors such as humidity and temperature can affect how Rhinolophus clivosus use echolocation. 

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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