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A group of around 300 whales produced 184 distinct songs over just a few years, according to a new study.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

By The Scientist Staff | April 4, 2018

Proteins and RNA aggregate into “membraneless organelles” due to liquid-liquid phase separation.

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image: OSU Professor Falsified Data on Eight Papers, Resigns

OSU Professor Falsified Data on Eight Papers, Resigns

By Catherine Offord | April 2, 2018

Ching-Shih Chen’s research involved anticancer therapeutics that were being tested in clinical trials.

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image: A Neuroscientist’s Journey Through Madness

A Neuroscientist’s Journey Through Madness

By Barbara Lipska with Elaine McArdle | April 1, 2018

After I was diagnosed with brain cancer and started to lose my mental health, the importance of my job came into clear focus.

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Social insects kill infected individuals for the benefit of the colony—and now a study has shown how they know who’s sick.

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A controversial hypothesis suggests that jellyfish may one day rule the oceans, and Mola mola may tell us if we are approaching a tipping point.

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image: Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

By Catherine Offord | March 22, 2018

Researchers pinpoint a protein that can metabolize at least one of the insecticides, highlighting a route to identifying compounds that are friendlier to the critical pollinators.

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image: Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

By The Scientist Staff | March 21, 2018

Volvox barberi actively organize themselves into large colonies that optimize space.

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Eight papers by Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson, a tissue engineer at the University of Gothenburg, have been flagged for image manipulation.

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image: Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

By Catherine Offord | March 20, 2018

A new study finds that more than 200 human-targeted, non-antibiotic drugs inhibit the growth of bacterial species that make up part of the human microbiome.

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