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image: Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

By | April 4, 2017

Childhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Medical Marijuana for Kids?

Medical Marijuana for Kids?

By | July 17, 2013

The drug has brought relief to children suffering from cancer and other serious ailments, but getting access is often limited by considerable regulatory hurdles.

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image: Leukemia Linked to Changes in Womb

Leukemia Linked to Changes in Womb

By | April 10, 2013

Genetic changes that may initiate childhood leukemia could originate while the baby is still in utero.

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image: Double the Mutations

Double the Mutations

By | January 30, 2012

Irradiated sperm of young male mice induce mutations in eggs upon fertilization, a phenomenon that may pose risks for the children of cancer survivors.

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