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image: Contributors

Contributors

By The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Slime Mold in Residence

Slime Mold in Residence

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 2, 2018

At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.  

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The artist discusses music as a means to get kids excited about science, and the inspiration he took from astrophysics and polar bears.

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image: Reimagining Neuroscience’s Finest Works of Art

Reimagining Neuroscience’s Finest Works of Art

By Aggie Mika | September 1, 2017

By recreating the work of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, art professor Dawn Hunter reveals how the master translated life to the page.

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By Abby Olena | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By The Scientist Staff | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By Eric Kandel | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Meet An Artist With No Hands

Meet An Artist With No Hands

By Kerry Grens | June 1, 2016

The brain can compensate for missing body parts, allowing some people, such as Matthias Buchinger, to function at a very high level despite their disabilities.

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