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The discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients’ recovery following treatment.

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image: Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

By | January 5, 2018

Signaling pathways triggered by the mother’s immune system may cause complications during fetal development.

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Fazlul Sarkar had unsuccessfully sued PubPeer to reveal the identity of a commenter who accused him of research misconduct.

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image: The Biggest Science Scandals of 2017

The Biggest Science Scandals of 2017

By | December 15, 2017

This year’s controversial news included unethical behavior among politicians, a murder, and multiple accusations of gender discrimination and sexual harassment, in addition to the usual spate of research misconduct.

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image: Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

By | December 4, 2017

T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

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A single receptor on natural killer cells recognizes an amino acid sequence conserved across Zika, dengue, and related pathogens.

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image: European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

By | November 20, 2017

Fotis Kafatos, a Greek researcher famous for his work on malaria, has died at age 77.

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A team has engineered two stem cell lines into “synthetic T cells” that destroy breast cancer cells in vitro. 

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Investigations into cases of wrongdoing by professors are increasingly in the public eye. But are colleges and universities doing enough to deal with the problem?

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The group calls for the retraction of six publications by surgeon Paolo Macchiarini regarding the synthetic trachea transplantations that led to the death of at least three patients. 

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