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image: European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

By | November 20, 2017

Fotis Kafatos, a Greek researcher famous for his work on malaria, has died at age 77.

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image: Immune Checkpoint Found Lacking in Type 1 Diabetes

Immune Checkpoint Found Lacking in Type 1 Diabetes

By | November 15, 2017

Boosting levels of a the immunosuppressive protein PD-L1 in blood stem cells halts diabetes in a mouse model of the disease.

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The former chief of Eli Lilly USA is picked to replace Tom Price, who stepped down in September amid a controversy over the abuse of taxpayer-funded travel.

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A team has engineered two stem cell lines into “synthetic T cells” that destroy breast cancer cells in vitro. 

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image: Child Receives Transgenic Skin Over Most of His Body

Child Receives Transgenic Skin Over Most of His Body

By | November 8, 2017

A combination gene-and-cell therapy has given a boy with a grievous skin disease a new lease on life, and has resolved a dermatology debate to boot.

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image: Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

By | November 1, 2017

The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.

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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

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image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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