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image: Pressure Mounts for EPA’s Scott Pruitt to Quit

Pressure Mounts for EPA’s Scott Pruitt to Quit

By Catherine Offord | June 14, 2018

Republicans and conservative media outlets are turning on the agency administrator as allegations of ethical misconduct and excessive spending pile up.

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image: US State Department Names New Science Envoys

US State Department Names New Science Envoys

By Shawna Williams | June 13, 2018

The five high-profile scientists are charged with helping strengthen international cooperation.

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The plan would also allow non-EU countries to pay to participate in EU research programs, albeit without wielding “decisional power.”

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image: Blood Test Predicts Pregnancy Due Date

Blood Test Predicts Pregnancy Due Date

By Kerry Grens | June 7, 2018

A small study based on circulating RNA in the blood of moms-to-be describes a technique that could be used to help predict who’s most at risk of preterm labor.

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The finding confirms that a cluster of cells that directs the fate of other cells in the developing embryo is evolutionarily conserved across the animal kingdom.

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Fall served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy under President Barack Obama.

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A study of 686 fish and invertebrates predicts that some animals will have to shift more than 1,000 kilometers to stay within tolerable temperatures.

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The extracellular matrix appears to inhibit regeneration; but scientists debate whether heart muscle really comes back.  

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image: Image of the Day: Swiss Army Crustacean

Image of the Day: Swiss Army Crustacean

By The Scientist Staff | May 2, 2018

The tools researchers used to study how this amphipod’s limbs develop could help inform our understanding of cell lineages and fates.

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Researchers stumbled across the connection while searching for ways to reduce vision problems in people with achromatopsia.

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