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image: How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic Wasps

How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic Wasps

By Shawna Williams | July 10, 2017

Ribosome-inactivating proteins from symbiotic bacteria leave their hosts unharmed.

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image: Next Generation: Blood-Cleansing Device

Next Generation: Blood-Cleansing Device

By Anna Azvolinsky | September 14, 2014

An external device that mimics the structure of a spleen can cleanse the blood of rats with acute sepsis, ridding the fluid of pathogens and toxins.

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image: Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Fighting Microbes with Microbes

By Amy Coombs | January 1, 2013

Doctors turn to good microbes to fight disease. Will the same strategy work with crops?

6 Comments

image: Weeding Out Arsenate

Weeding Out Arsenate

By Sabrina Richards | October 3, 2012

A miniscule change in a hydrogen bond angle explains how bacteria can select phosphate over arsenate even in high-arsenate conditions.

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image: Down and Dirty

Down and Dirty

By Amy Coombs | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."

3 Comments

image: Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

By Edyta Zielinska | August 17, 2012

Mice with inflammatory bowel disease harbor gut bacteria that damage host DNA, predisposing mice to cancer.

1 Comment

image: Bacterial Exploitation

Bacterial Exploitation

By Ruth Williams | July 5, 2012

Field studies reveal non-virulent bacteria take advantage of their virulent counterparts to get a free pass into their host.

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image: Live and In Color

Live and In Color

By Sarah Webb | April 1, 2012

How to track RNA in living cells

2 Comments

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