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A closer moon and ideal coastal conditions for tide pool formation may have started the evolutionary transition of tetrapods.

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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: Federal Science Funding Could Increase Under New Budget Deal

Federal Science Funding Could Increase Under New Budget Deal

By Shawna Williams | February 12, 2018

Congress has increased discretionary spending caps, making it possible that the budgets of US science agencies will rise this fiscal year.

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image: Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

By Ashley Yeager | February 9, 2018

The technique could combat infertility, but it's still not clear whether these eggs are normal and functional.

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image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.

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Pectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: CDC Director Resigns Over Unresolved Conflicts of Interest

CDC Director Resigns Over Unresolved Conflicts of Interest

By Shawna Williams | January 31, 2018

Brenda Fitzgerald had drawn criticism for tobacco-related investments, among others.

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