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In cooperation with its microbiome, the animal has genetic help in digesting blood and warding off pathogens.

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image: Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

By Ashley Yeager | February 9, 2018

The technique could combat infertility, but it's still not clear whether these eggs are normal and functional.

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Researchers find that while bats in the Myotis genus don’t produce telomerase, the enzyme that lengthens telomeres, they possess 21 telomere maintenance–related genes.

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image: DNA Analysis Paints New Picture of 10,000-Year-Old Briton

DNA Analysis Paints New Picture of 10,000-Year-Old Briton

By Shawna Williams | February 7, 2018

“Cheddar Man” had dark hair and blue eyes, a sequencing analysis suggests.

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image: Image of the Day: Colorado Potato Beetles

Image of the Day: Colorado Potato Beetles

By The Scientist Staff | February 6, 2018

Leptinotarsa decemlineata has been decimating agricultural crops since at least the 19th century, and by sequencing its genome researchers hope to explore new strategies for controlling the pest.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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Pectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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MinION achieved the longest reads of DNA sequences to date. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Swearing is Good for You</em>

Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for You

By Emma Byrne | January 24, 2018

In chapter 1, “The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,” author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.

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