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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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image: Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

By The Scientist Staff | August 8, 2017

A failing heart is easily distinguished from a healthy one by numerous tell-tale signs, including its slender, stretched-out walls, increased size, and pooled blood clots.

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image: Heart’s Backup Pacemaker Mechanisms Identified

Heart’s Backup Pacemaker Mechanisms Identified

By Diana Kwon | July 28, 2017

The sinoatrial node is home to multiple pacemakers that keep the heart beating if the main one falters.

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By Amanda B. Keener | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By Amanda B. Keener | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Hearts in Hand

Hearts in Hand

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2016

Texas Heart Institute heart surgeon Bud Frazier is a pioneer of heart transplant technologies.

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image: If It Ain't Broke . . .

If It Ain't Broke . . .

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2016

Is there room to improve upon the tried-and-true, decades-old technology of artificial hearts?

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image: Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

By Jef Akst | May 1, 2014

A report reveals that using bone marrow stem cells to treat heart disease is less promising than a decade of research has let on.

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image: Saving Failing Hearts

Saving Failing Hearts

By Kate Yandell | March 12, 2014

Inhibiting a small regulatory RNA appears to improve cardiac function in mice with surgically induced heart problems.

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image: Next Generation: Sensor-Laden Sheath to Monitor the Heart

Next Generation: Sensor-Laden Sheath to Monitor the Heart

By Daniel Cossins | February 25, 2014

A flexible, sensor-loaded membrane that fits snugly around the heart provides high-resolution monitoring of multiple cardiac health markers.

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